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Red Herrings (Spoilers for all three books)
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08/17/2017 - 4:55 pm

I use audio books too and love it. The books come to life. I think the Red Herrings are fun. Keeps you guessing as to what is going on and how our hero's get distracted.

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08/07/2017 - 10:23 pm

janeausten24 said

Or else, fling the headphones out of both ears as you painfully listen to the same sections of the audiobook over and over again...I don't know if it's just me, but the way Robert Glenister reads the books somehow makes them come even more alive than they do on the page. He reads the books beautifully...and also I don't think I could ever imagine all of the accents she describes ๐Ÿ˜›ย ย 

I've never listened to an audio book before, I find it difficult to concentrate when listening to the spoken word for long stretches. Maybe I should give it a shot, though, because I would love to hear the accents as they should be heard!

~~~ Follow me on Tumblr | Find my Strike Series Fanfic on A03 ~~~

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08/07/2017 - 10:09 pm

LindMea said

God, yes, that's the kind of red herring that makes one pitch the book across the room :pย ย 

Or else, fling the headphones out of both ears as you painfully listen to the same sections of the audiobook over and over again...I don't know if it's just me, but the way Robert Glenister reads the books somehow makes them come even more alive than they do on the page. He reads the books beautifully...and also I don't think I could ever imagine all of the accents she describes ๐Ÿ˜›

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08/07/2017 - 10:07 pm

janeausten24 said

But of course the biggest red herring of all was the huge relief she made us feel when Matt seemed to be gone for good and we thought the road was clear for Strike and Robin to finally get together......:( ๐Ÿ™ ๐Ÿ™ย ย 

God, yes, that's the kind of red herring that makes one pitch the book across the room :p

~~~ Follow me on Tumblr | Find my Strike Series Fanfic on A03 ~~~

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08/07/2017 - 8:07 pm

I definitely agree about the red herrings! I have always seen JK Rowling as primarily a mystery author (as many others have noticed, nearly every Harry Potter novel has a central mystery driving the plot! Who has opened the Chamber of Secrets, Who is trying to steal the Philosopher's Stone, Who put Harry's name in the goblet, etc.)...so I wasn't surprised to see how expertly she weaved red herrings into her intricate mystery plots.

For me, I always loved the Silkworm mystery for being a huge red herring in and of itself: that the supposed Bombyx Mori was never really Quine's! Having so much attributed to Quine (the book, the parody, etc) that turned out to be a false assumption was so exciting for me as a reader aha.

And in Career of Evil, there's the whole red herring about Brittany being the dead girl, and also about "it;" personally when I read the killer's description of his partner, I was sure it was Whitacre at first, simply because his version of "It" also seemed to ring so true with Stephanie. So Rowling actually created three characters, two of whose story lines were strewn with red herrings as to who "It" could be, who the killer was masquerading as, who this supposed missing son was, etc.

But of course the biggest red herring of all was the huge relief she made us feel when Matt seemed to be gone for good and we thought the road was clear for Strike and Robin to finally get together......:( ๐Ÿ™ ๐Ÿ™

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08/06/2017 - 3:34 am

Wait, these books have plots? I thought they were just about two idiots falling in love...

( I never have any hope of guessing the killer, I have NO ability to solve mysteries. Usually I just go along for the ride without even trying to figure it out! You're right that the Brockbank subplot was wrapped up, which makes me feel even more certain that Whittaker will be back in a future book - he's the only one of the three subjects whose story is left hanging.)

~~~ Follow me on Tumblr | Find my Strike Series Fanfic on A03 ~~~

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08/06/2017 - 3:27 am

In nearly every crime fiction novel, film or TV series there's almost always red herrings. They are there to distract you from the truth, to stop you guessing who the real killer is. I want to discuss the major red herrings in all three Cormoran Strike books, sorry f my memory is a bit rusty in parts. What I really love about the way J.K. Rowling inserts red herrings into the story is that they always lead somewhere; there's always a story arc with a satisfying conclusion.

In The Cuckoo's Calling, John Bristow comes to Cormoran as a client with a lengthy set of notes he wrote with dates and times, and which state the two men in the CCTV footage as being both black. As you know from the ending of the book, John Bristow is one of the men in black clothing and he wrote the notes deliberately trying to set up Evan Duffield (if my memory isn't failing me?) I don't know about you but Evan Duffield was always high on the list for me, and it totally surprised me finding out about Jonah Agyeman being the black male in the CCTV footage. But Evan Duffield, or even Jonah, being a black male was never the major red herring for me.
As soon as we meet Tony Landry at the Serpentine Bar and Kitchen, he wants to put a stop to the case. This in itself is very suspicious and a lot of suspicious things followed. Why was Tony in London the day before Lula was murdered when he was supposed to be elsewhere? He claimed he was visiting his ill sister, but did we really believe that? It is clear to us when Tony appears in the book that he's a very nasty, controlling man. I thought Tony was the killer until the reveal. But we find out that Tony wasn't in London at all or visiting his sister, he was actually in a hotel room with Ursula May, Cyprian May's wife. His suspicious behavior was all down to him having an affair. Not the killer after all. It was all tied up really nicely in the concluding chapters.

Again, in The Silkworm, there plenty of smaller red herrings, but the major one for me was the storyline with Jerry Waldegrave and Michael Fancourt having an affair with Jerry's wife. Michael Fancourt is an arrogant arse and is a very suspicious character all the way through the book. In Bombyx Mori he is accused of being the biological father or Jerry Waldegrave's daughter. Owen Quine, or Elizabeth, as we know, wrote the parody leading to Fancourt's wife's death. So I thought from this that perhaps he still holds the grudge and would kill Owen for this. There's also the fact Owen shouted "all because of Michael and his limp fucking dick" which confused me for a while. Anyway, I can't remember all the details. I'm rambling on about pointless shit, but it all seemed to wrap up nicely in the end.

Career of Evil's major red herring was Noel Brockbank. When Robin rings Noel he mistakenly thinks it's Brittany Brockbank, though we didn't know this at the time, which made me think he knew who she was and was the one following her. "Do I know you little girl?" Everything seemed to point to Noel: he was living with a woman who seemed to be supporting him and he was certainly evil enough. Robin seemed to take on Noel Brockbank herself, she took the case personally and she needed to do something about Noel living with a young girl when she knew he's a pedophile. Robin goes to Noel's house and saves the young girls from him. The case was solved, even if it wasn't the murder case, it was a satisfying conclusion and heroic moment for Robin.

I'm really sorry about this, when I started the discussion I thought I could remember more than I do. I can't remember all the details of why Michael Fancourt was my main red herring. My memory is failing me. But he was definitely the big one for me and it ended in a satisfying way and wasn't a pointless lead. That's what I like about Rowling's way of making everything wrap up so nicely, there's no loose ends, everything in the story is there for a reason, even if it isn't to end in a killer being uncovered.
What were the main red herrings for you? What threw you off so much you didn't guess the killer correctly? Hopefully you can remember details better than me; I'll have to re-read the books.

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